Policy and Procedures

Extended Articles on Policies and Procedures

Chair Responsibilities, Panels and Roundtables

By proposing and accepting the role of chairing a panel or roundtable, the chair accepts the responsibility of informing the Program Chair(s) of all changes in the composition of the panel or roundtable as soon as possible. (Any changes should be sent to the Program Chairs immediately, though those sent after December may not be reflected in the printed program). Fellow panelists should also be informed of any changes well before the meeting begins. The chair also accepts the responsibility of informing the Program Chair(s) of any panelist who fails to attend the panel (forwarding their reasons, should they be provided by the missing panelists).

The Chair is also charged with organizing the structure of the panel, both before the Convention begins and during. If chairing a roundtable, the chair should circulate a detailed memo regarding the issues to be discussed by the participants well in advance of the meeting. If chairing a panel,  it is the chair's responsibility to take all reasonable steps to ensure that the discussants receive advance copies of papers, even in draft form. Five working days prior to the commencement of the meetings is the absolute minimum acceptable lead-time. At the convention, the chair shall hold participants to agreed-upon time limits for their presentations, so that at least thirty minutes are available for general discussion.

Rationale: Stimulating scholarly interchange requires that panelists attend their panels and roundtables, and that adequate time be set aside for discussion among panelists and the audience. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide accurate information about the nature and composition of a particular panel or roundtable and to provide sufficient time for the participants and audience to interact.

Posted in: Annual Convention

The International Studies Association

Representing over 100 countries, ISA has more than 6,500 members worldwide and is the most respected and widely known scholarly association in this field. Endeavoring to create communities of scholars dedicated to international studies, ISA is divided into 7 geographic subdivisions of ISA (Regions), 29 thematic groups (Sections) and 4 Caucuses which provide opportunities to exchange ideas and research with local colleagues and within specific subject areas.
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