ISA 2021: Call for Proposals

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The global pandemic has changed many things about our personal and professional lives. At ISA, we have been working diligently since the cancellation of #ISA2020 in Honolulu to understand how these changes impact what we do professionally and in service to our members. ISA Headquarters’ staff have been researching the feasibility of a wide array of options for #ISA2021, ranging from an in-person to hybrid to an entirely virtual event.

While we all hoped to be able to meet in person, the health and safety of the ISA community is our top priority. We have determined that the ISA 2021 Convention will move to an entirely virtual platform. Given the ambiguity of global vaccination distribution, on-going travel restrictions, budget cuts and the potential on-site spacing constraints for in-person events, we saw little room for a different choice.

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Call for Proposals: Globalization, Regionalism and Nationalism: Contending Forces in World Politics

ISA 62nd Annual Convention
April 6th – 9th, 2021

Meet the 2021 Program Chairs

 

New Opportunities to Showcase Your Research

 

In pivoting to virtual, we are excited to be able to leverage some new technology options to provide a few new presentation opportunities for attendees and participants.

New submissions are welcome! If you have a paper on the waitlist that you would like considered for this new participation option, please resubmit your proposal (you will not be able to edit previously submitted items). The deadline for submissions for poster paper and research sound byte proposals is November 30th, and notifications of acceptance will be sent December 10th.

Submission Deadline: November 30, 2020

Submit Today!

 

Poster paper presentations will take the form of an asynchronous visual presentation by the author(s) throughout the Convention and will also have a prearranged time slot for a separate live interaction between presenters and other participants. Additionally, every poster will be assigned a discussant. Presenters will utilize our new virtual poster session technology to craft and share their posters and will be able to embed text, images, audio, video, and narration into their posters.

Poster paper submissions will need a title, abstract, three tags and the author(s) to submit. Titles need to be less than 50 words and abstracts need to be less than 200 words. We also ask submitters to suggest 3-5 names of individuals whom they feel would be well placed to discuss their research. Please note, poster paper proposals are exempt from submission/participation limits.

This new submission type combines virtual discussion panels and short, pre-recorded videos in order to provide presenters with a new way of sharing their research and engaging their fellow conference participants. Accepted presenters will record their research in a 5-7 minute video which will be available throughout the conference for all registered attendees to access and watch. Presenters will be organized into larger thematic panels which will come together in the latter half of the Convention and discuss each other's work, each participant having already watched each other's videos.

Research Sound Byte submissions require a title, abstract, at least three tag words and the author(s) in order to submit. Titles need to be less than 50 words and abstracts need to be less than 200 words. Accepted submissions will be expected to provide their 5-7 minute videos in February of 2021.

Coming in the new year (and pending virtual space constraints), we anticipate being able to offer the possibility of a new roundtable-style submission, centered around Current Events. Stay tuned in January 2021 for more details!

 

Over the last two decades, the volume and intensity of attacks on globalization have been steadily rising. The backlash has not been confined to rich countries; developing countries such as India, Philippines, Brazil, Malaysia, and others are also witnessing popular challenges to the liberal international order. Since the mid-1940s, the architects of the Bretton Wood system set the stage for a liberal international order that has governed political and economic relations between capitalist and democratic nations.  Although this is not the first time the liberal international order has been challenged, it is now being resisted through democratic elections and expressed through populist, nationalist, protectionist and anti-globalization movements.  International organizations that were given the mandate to institutionalize rules of the liberal order are increasingly under threat and viewed to be interfering the domestic authority of states.  In various ways and in many countries throughout the world, individuals, political parties, and grassroots movements are challenging different aspects of ‘liberal’, ‘international’, and ‘order’.

Our 2021 conference theme seeks to understand the actors, anxieties, and political forces in international and domestic politics that are shaping- and shaped by- the changing world.  Scholars in the international studies profession- who analyze the interactions between power, voice, and rules at the local and international level- are well poised to provide insights into these trends.  At the same time, these current challenges require a fresh approach to our study of international politics, focused on engagement and communication across ideological, disciplinary, regional and methodological lines to more fully understand recent unanticipated (and anticipated) global events.  We invite proposals that tackle these issues from a variety of perspectives and at a variety of levels of analysis. We are particularly interested in work that helps us 1) understand changes at the global level influence regional, national, and local politics, or 2) the reverse: how local, national or regional political interactions might be changing the global order. 

Some representative questions the theme might address include:

  1. What are the forces challenging the liberal international order (LIO)? Are these similar across regions? Countries? international institutions?
  2. What interests are and are not represented in anti-globalization movements?
  3. How have the current structures of power and rules in the LIO influenced the rise of countervailing forces today?
  4. How can we explain the role of emerging powers and/or the Global South in the politics influencing support and resistance to the current liberal international order?
  5. How and under what conditions does local dissatisfaction with LIO impact power structures change?
  6. What is the perspective of the Global South and how are they reacting to these trends?
  7. What is the future of US political and economic relations with other rising powers, and China in particular?
  8. What are the challenges brought by accelerating trade, supply chains, capital and technology flows? How and under what conditions do they impact international relations, domestic politics and society?
  9. How is the current LIO impacting nationalist fever and ethnic conflict?
  10. How do we envision the legitimacy and functioning of international organizations in the changing global economy?
  11. How do we understand the role of national and local democratic institutions in the face of changing global order? Under what conditions is current angst about globalization placing democratic institutions under threat?
  12. What is the role of public opinion in shaping governance issues related to globalization?
  13. What are the most successful strategies for economic and political development in this new era?
  14. How are local, national, and international level governments dealing with global crises such as climate change, and immigration?

Types of Proposals

Most proposals are traditional types including papers, panels, and roundtables. ISA also has a series of specialty programs that are submitted through a separate form.

Papers are the foundation of the Annual Convention and can be submitted individually or within a larger panel proposal. Papers generally need a title, abstract, three tags and the author(s) to submit. Titles need to be less than 50 words and abstracts need to be less than 200 words.

Note that, if you have a paper that was submitted on a panel, you should not submit the paper independently a second time. 

Junior Scholar Symposium: JSS submissions are not a separate submission type but all individual papers can also be marked for consideration for JSS placement (you'll find a check box at the bottom of the general tab in the submission form). Those papers not placed onto JSS panels will be considered for standard panel placement along with the rest of the independent paper proposal submissions before the normal review process begins.

Flash Talks: Flash talk submissions are both a separate submission type OR individual papers can be marked for consideration for Flash Talk placement (you'll find a check box at the bottom of the general tab in the submission form). Unlike a full research talk given in traditional panels, a Flash Talk is an overview of a study. Presenters must draw out the most important aspects of their research in a compressed time-frame and then field a series of questions immediately thereafter. This is a great opportunity to present and discuss new ideas on working or completed papers and get valuable feedback from peers. A Flash Talk session will consist of several research projects discussed using brief PowerPoint presentations.

Poster Gallery: Poster Gallery submissions are not a separate submission type but all individual papers can also be marked for consideration for Poster Gallery placement (you'll find a check box at the bottom of the general tab in the submission form). These panels provide presenters with the opportunity to share their research in a visual format, with ISA leadership and  journal editors offering direct feedback.

Unlike a full research talk given in traditional panels, a Flash Talk is an overview of a study. Presenters must draw out the most important aspects of their research in a compressed time-frame and then field a series of questions immediately thereafter. This is a great opportunity to present and discuss new ideas on working or completed papers and get valuable feedback from peers. A Flash Talk session will consist of several research projects discussed using brief PowerPoint presentations.

Note that, if you have a paper that was marked as a flash talk submission, you should not submit the flash talk independently a second time. 

Panels must have a title, abstract and tag words as well as 5 papers (complete with title, tags, abstract and authors) and at least 1 chair and discussant. Titles need to be less than 50 words and abstracts need to be less than 200 words.

Please note that papers submitted on panels should not be submitted a second time independently of the panel. If the panel is not accepted, the papers submitted on the panel go into the normal wait pool with all of our other papers.

Roundtables are similar to panels but participants do not present papers. At least 1 chair and 5 participants are needed to submit a panel, along with title, tags and abstract.Titles need to be less than 50 words and abstracts need to be less than 200 words.

 

Innovative Panels

Innovative panels offer an opportunity for a little creativity and experimentation. An innovative panel proposal will need the standard title, tags and abstract, along with additional information about the "vision" behind the proposal and a designated chair. Titles need to be less than 50 words and abstracts need to be less than 200 words.

More information

 

Career Courses

These courses are different from normal sessions at ISA in many ways. Most notably, they are designed to be in a "classroom" format with an instructor teaching on a given topic. Registrants will be able to sign up for the classes on a first-come-first-served basis when they open in the Fall. Instructors will receive a stipend for teaching the course.

If you are interested in teaching a course, you can submit your proposal through this site. The Professional Development Committee will evaluate proposed courses and select those that we will hold in Las Vegas.

More information

 

"In Other Words" Roundtables

These specialty roundtables are a series of non-English roundtables that seek to explore the role of the English language in governing academic practice, facilitating (or impending communication, and determining academic proficiency and legitimacy within the discipline of International Relations. Proposals should be submitted in both English and the chosen language, and should include: title, abstract, three tags, and the names, email addresses and institutional affiliations of participations (which should include a chair and between 6 and 7 panelists).

More information

New Opportunities

Standard submissions for ISA2021 closed in June, but we're excited to announce a few new opportunities for program participation! Check below for details.

New Submission Options

Submit a Proposal