Career Courses Archive

How to Successfully Use Participatory Methods in Formal Education

Instructor: Kathryn Mangino
Is the PowerPoint / lecture combination the best way to connect with students, ensure information retention and inspire learners to love the subject at hand? Many professors, lecturers and educators would disagree - and add that HOW content is presented is just as important as (if not more important than) the content itself. It is therefore often desirable to use participatory methods in classroom instruction - whether you're creating a brand new syllabus or updating an old one, preparing for large lectures or small seminars. But what does this mean? How do you do it? This career course will not only introduce participants to a variety of participatory methods, but will also give attendees the time, space and instruction to practice these new methods during the session. By the end of the career course, participants will develop the skills needed to make immediate applications in their own classrooms and professional situations. This career course is highly interactive and allows participants to learn from each other, share best practices and meet other ISA professionals with similar interests.

Case Writing and Case Teaching in International Relations

Instructor: Volker Franke
In this half-day course, participants will be introduced to the case study method and learn how to develop and use case studies effectively in an academic classroom. This course presents a number of different teaching cases (historical, fictional, decision-forcing) and engages participants as both active learners and potential instructors. The course will also discuss how to adapt the case teaching method for using novels and films in the classroom.

Intelligence Analysis as Discovery of Evidence, Hypotheses, and Arguments: Connecting the Dots

Instructor: Gheorghe Tecuci, Mihai Boicu and Dorin Marcu
Following the instructor's recently-published book with this title, this course teaches the evidential and inferential issues involved in "connecting the dots" to draw defensible and persuasive conclusions from masses of evidence of all types, in a world that is changing all the time. To facilitate the understanding of these issues and enable the performance of complex analyses, the course also introduces an intelligent analytical tool (Disciple-CD) for evidence-based hypotheses analyses. The course will be taught with many exercises, in a style congenial to the interests of a broad audience, regardless of its prior background and training. It will also discuss how various university or professional development courses may integrate modules with some of the presented topics.

How to Successfully Use Participatory Methods for Training and Education

Instructor: Kate Mangino
This career course will not only introduce participants to a variety of participatory methods, but will also give attendees the time, space and instruction to practice these new methods during the session so they will develop the skills needed to apply them in their own professional situations.

Simulations and Games in International Relations

Instructors: Amanda Rosen and Victor Asal
This career course introduces instructors to the benefits and drawbacks of simulations and games as well as practical tips for employing them in the classroom. Participants will play through several different simulations and games during the session and will receive extensive materials and guides towards employing them in their own classes.

Case Writing and Case Teaching in International Relations

Instructor: Volker Franke
In this half-day course, participants will be introduced to the case study method and learn how to develop and use case studies effectively in an academic classroom. This course presents a number of different teaching cases (historical, fictional, decision-forcing) and engages participants as both active learners and potential instructors. The course will also discuss how to adapt the case teaching method for using novels and films in the classroom.

Training Future Peacebuilders: Designing International Education Programs to Maximize Transnational Networks and Peacebuilding Outcomes

Instructor: Jeff Pugh
This session helps educators design program models that intentionally cultivate cross-cultural interaction and network building, and support follow up that translate these networks into practical peacebuilding outcomes over time.

Case Writing and Case Teaching in International Relations

Instructor: Volker Franke
This half-day course, participants will be introduced to the case study method and learn how to develop and use case studies effectively in an academic classroom. This course presents a number of different teaching cases (historical, fictional, decision-forcing) and engages participants as both active learners and potential instructors. The course will also discuss how to adapt the case teaching method for using novels and films in the classroom.

Doing and Using Elite Interviews

Instructor: Peter Haas and Kathryn Hochstetler
The course will seek to combine goals of rigor with the art of elite interviews. The course will introduce students to issues involved with conducting elite interviews: the nature of data, how to design an interview, logistics, data confirmation, and dealing with IRBs.

Introduction to Big Data Analytics and Text Mining in International Affairs Research

Instructor: Derrick Cogburn
This course is designed to introduce participants to some of the opportunities and limitations of “Big Data” Analytics in International Affairs research. While the concept of Big Data is relative to each field, as much as 75-80% of the world’s available data is unstructured text. Data of this type includes: email archives, websites, twitter feeds and other social media, blog posts, speeches, annual reports, published articles, and much more. In the aggregate, these sources can easily run into thousands or hundreds of thousands of discrete items. Textual data at this size and scale is particularly challenging to the analyst using only traditional forms of content analysis, and is even challenging to those scholars using Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) tools, who find it difficult to cope with the time and effort required to analyze these large data sources. This course provides an initial exposure to the tools and techniques used to analyze large-scale unstructured textual data. These approaches are applicable for a range of social science research topics, such as identifying: core themes and regional variation in State Department blog posts; sentiment analysis of twitter feeds; emerging areas of concern or interest on email lists; similarities and differences in national reports on international treaty commitments. In this course, we will employ a “learn by doing” technique. This means the course will include an introduction to the theoretical background to big data and text mining, but will focus primarily on a practical, hands-on approach. This technique allows participants to spend more time working in the software that enables them to harness computational power to analyze the large-scale unstructured textual data. Essentially, this course can help set participants on the path towards being able to find the proverbial needle in the international affairs big data haystack.

Simulations and Games for the Classroom

Instructors: Victor Asal, Nina Collars, Chad Raymond, and Amanda Rosen
In this Career Course, participants will examine the use of simulations and games in the classroom. They will play several simulations to learn about the benefits and challenges of running such exercises with students. The instructors will also provide a wealth of resources, including samples of games and sims that can be used with little modification in their own classes.

About Career Courses

ISA Career Courses are a key component of the Association’s Annual Convention professional development programming. These courses provide registered participants an in-depth instruction on topics such as methodology, teaching strategies, software, and more.

More about Career Courses

The International Studies Association

Representing over 100 countries, ISA has more than 6,500 members worldwide and is the most respected and widely known scholarly association in this field. Endeavoring to create communities of scholars dedicated to international studies, ISA is divided into 6 geographic subdivisions of ISA (Regions), 29 thematic groups (Sections) and 4 Caucuses which provide opportunities to exchange ideas and research with local colleagues and within specific subject areas.
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